FRED STUCKY

FredStucky1.0 – What is it about rock & roll that makes people feel good?

For me its the feeling I got when I heard Lou Reed “Walk On The Wild Side” on the radio when i was a boy has never really gone away. It made me love rock so much. I was probably 8 or 9. The song was so exotic. Such a trip far from my world. I was so hooked on this thing that came out of the radio. “Jumpin Jack Flash” on an AM transistor radio in Philly in the early 70’s was pretty magical.

So its escape and energy and fantasy and freedom for 3-6 minutes when tuned in. That feeling is hard to beat.

2.0 – How did you catch the roots bug?
As a kid. I heard Jerry Reed singing “Amos Moses” on the school bus for a few months. The song just pulled me in.  A little later “Tumbling Dice” was a hit. I knew I loved these songs and tones. The way they melded country and blues and their souls all together. It was clear to me they had something, some magic,  that no one I knew had. I wanted it.  It took a while but I melded them all to my satisfaction.

Also–In the early to mid 70’s all I listened to in my fathers old Jeep were 8 track tapes of, Willie Nelson live, Ernest Tubb, Charley Pride, And Hank Williams.

3.0 – Is there an artist that sets the barometer for you today?

Merle Haggard, Waylon Jennings and the mid period Rolling Stones

They wrote songs so honestly.  “Swinging Doors” what a brutal song. “Black Rose” is hard to top. “Let It bleed” is an amazing release as is “Beggars Banquet”.

The Stones from that 69-73 period is hard to get around. I think all of my songs have a taste of “Torn and Frayed” in them.

4.0 – Your new GAS MONEY disc Untethered is incredibly authentic, is that function of maturity now as a band?

Thank you.

I think just did not care how honest and sincere I was. It was my goal to get it right like Merle Haggard done on his classics. Every song is a true story on Untethered. With that it was easy to to be free to let the songs come to life.

I was also very tuned into the detail of the pedal steel and acoustic guitars. The levels and accents of both made it sound the way it does. All of this comes with getting older and being more patient and relaxed.

Many things on this recording were done on the spot in the studio. It was very organic you might say. And with that I let go and let people do what they do best. Very rewarding.

Untethered5.0 – What did it take to get the sound you were looking for on the record?

I knew it in my head.

I had a clear vision of what it was I wanted and but at the same time it was not letting that idea take control. The Stones song “Let It Bleed” and that LP  was the basis for the entire release production wise. The instrument selection along the way was fun too. Some of my old guitars & mandolins & banjo’s would just step right up and say this song is my song.  I then focused on the acoustic track and the snare.

6.0 – What took so long for the sophomore effort to the debut, 22 Dollars?

I had a family. My Son was born right after 22 Dollars came out. We had a daughter two years later. So life was busy for me just that simple. In  2011 we moved from an old stone house built in 1926 to a new townhouse.  No house maintenance and the kids being older was a real treat. The songs just poured out that summer.

7.0 – What’s your attitude when it comes to your gear live and/or in the studio?

Simplicity and tone.

My live gear is very basic. 59′ Grestch 6120, 58′ Fender tweed deluxe amp and a early 70’s Echoplex. That’s it.

The studio is a real treat. I have been collecting vintage instruments since the mid 80’s when I was in college. Nothing is more fun than bringing these old guitars, mandolins, banjos, steels and amps to life. I want them all to be used and to sing. Let the instruments do their job. I’m just strumming.

8.0 – How does a song usually start for you, with a riff? a title? a progression?

Typically its a title or a key line in a song and I build on that. The song “Every Empty Bottle” was originally called “Reinvent The Feel”. I came up with that line one night in my garage and wrote it on the side of a box with a sharpie pen. I looked up at that box for over a year. Then I used the phrase in the song. The idea of reinventing a feel stuck with me. The song wrote itself after that.

“High water” was written during the hurricane we had in august of 2011. The amount of rain was used as a parallel to a past romance I had. The song just spun naturally out with using the vision of a big flood and a tough breakup. The riff was much more rock as I was using barre chords. I changed the feel using the first position voicing.

9.0 – Is it true rockabilly is a way of life where, if you don’t buy in full-on, you are an outsider?

I have always been somewhat of an outsider with the rockabilly scene. Gas Money was described once as The Replacements of Rockabilly“. We have never really been embraced as a rockabilly band per se. Nor did I want to be.  We play lots of rockabilly but there was something a little wrong about the way we played it in the 90’s.

I have a deep love for rockabilly and I always will. The shit that comes along with the music however is somewhat silly. I have had an odd relationship with the genre for a long time. The music is magic but the scene surrounding it makes me a bit uneasy. Those big rockabilly shows are like Halloween parties.

Playing live now however we do three sets of classic honky tonk and rockabilly. The bars and clubs we play are interested in dancing and drinking not original music. We don’t get paid playing our tunes. The classics are really fun and ya know who else in Philly is playing George Jones “You’re Still On My Mind” with a pedal steel player on a sat night. No one. I think in a way it helped my song writing with playing classic honky tonk songs.

10.0 – Is it possible that certain guitars may contain magical properties?

It is true. I have a few pre-war Gibson flat tops,  50’s Gretsch hollow-bodies as well as some pre-war Gibson mandolins and banjos. Each one really is unique and has its own voice and character. As a player I can pick up a guitar at a friends house or at a vintage guitar show and just “feel” it.  Especially the pre-war mandolins and banjos. They want to talk and just don’t get out like they used to. yeah old wood is magic without a doubt. It’s intoxicating if you get hooked on it.

MATT MAGUIRE

1.0 – Are you happy with how your debut Larabee EP Expose A Little Wire has been received?
I am happy. I didn’t know what to expect when I made the decision to release the songs.  It’s been a pleasant surprise to have total strangers listen to the songs and react to them in a positive way.  I’m hoping more people will get to hear the songs as well.

2.0 – Did you have specific goals in mind for the release? There was no master plan for the release of Expose a Little Wire other than to follow in the footsteps of other DIY musicians.  It’s a tricky time in the music business because somewhere along the way people began to assume that music should be free.  So financial goals are difficult to assess.  The main goal is to put the music out and make a connection with people.

3.0 – Are there any plans for a full-length follow up to the EP? There are definitely plans for more recorded music.  I’d love to record a full-length album.  I will probably put out a single or another EP before a full-length because I have songs in the can that I would rather release than hold onto for too long.

4.0 – Do you have a philosophy when it comes to recording?  My philosophy on recording is to get a song to a point where you feel as though you could listen to it forever.  The most frustrating thing about recording is to put in the time, effort and money and come out with something that you can’t stand to listen to.  From a sound perspective, I like classic 1960’s and 1970s recording sounds and styles because on the whole those sounds have staying power.  There’s nothing sadder than to put on a 1980s recording that you loved at the time and realize that the 80s big drum sound ruins the track.  I wish I was more technically oriented so that I could have a better working knowledge of the recording process.  That’s something I need to work on going forward.

5.0 – Your video for “Little Liar” has a great old school vibe & look, how did it come about? Thanks.  I saw other videos that used old footage from various places and came across a neat website that compiled stuff that was no longer covered by copyright, so it was fair game to use.  In searching through the archives I found pieces of a film called “Coffeehouse Rendezvous.”  It was really cheesy but I liked the overall look and feel of it.  Parts of the film were originally shot in the Chestnut Hill neighborhood of Philadelphia, not far from my house, so I used those bits and pieces as a nod to my hometown.  Throw in an iMovie editing feature, and you have yourself a video.  There, I’ve given away all of my video creation secrets.

6.0 – When did you get hooked on rock & roll? what songs early in life left a mark on you most? Probably by age 5.  I am the youngest of five children and I used to sit in my room for hours playing my older sisters’ records – hairbrush microphone in hand.  That stack of 45s was full of Motown, Gary Puckett and the Union Gap, The Foundations, The Monkees and The Beatles.  From the stack of 45s I think The Foundations “Baby Now That I Found You” got a lot of play.  Seriously, how can anybody resist the “ba da da da” background vocals?  A little later I would say that Elvis Costello’s “The Angels Want To Wear My Red Shoes” left a big mark.  That song was really my introduction to The Byrds because of the jangly guitar sound.  Nick Lowe’s Labor of Lust album in it’s entirety is fantastic as is Please Panic by The Vulgar Boatmen.

7.0 –  Have your tunes always had a twang to them or did that develop over time? I think the twang developed over time, but I was always drawn to the twangy stuff by The Monkees did (Papa Gene’s Blues, What I Am I Doing Hangin’ Round), Dave Edmunds, Nick Lowe.  I also had some old Faron Young records as a kid.  I suppose that sound keeps kicking around in my head.

8.0 – Do songs come easy to you or are they labors of love that have to steep before being ready for prime time?  The songs couldn’t come any slower if I tried.  I wish that I could be one of those writers who can bang out song after song.  I am always amazed when I hear someone say that they went into the studio with 30 new songs and whittled it down to 10.  Once written, however, the song structure doesn’t tend to change drastically.

9.0 –  Is there anyone in your life, outside the band, that you trust as sounding board for new material?  I have a friend from high school, Gerry, who used to help manage my old band.  He’s listened to everything I’ve written since I started playing.  His opinion matters because he knows good music and he understands what makes a good song good.

10.0 – Dreaming late last night you got a call from ‘Mr. Bigg’ about a summer tour, what act are you going out in support of?  It would have to be Elvis Costello, but only because he was touring with the spinning wheel of songs from the entirety of his career.  So many great songs.  And because this happened in a dream, all of the fans at the show would become Larabee fans.

DAVE GODDESS

1.0  As an artist, what’s important to you?  Love, truth, soul.

2.0  Tell us about recording your new CD, “Something New.” I worked on it for a couple of years. Most of the time was spent thinking about it rather than doing it. In that time, I spent maybe 40 days in the studio. I wouldn’t change a thing about the CD, and I’ve never been able to say that about any of my previous recordings. This may have a lot to do with taking that time to sit with the tracks and play with them until I was satisfied. I worked through lots of material before settling on the twelve songs on “Something New.” Also, I have a great band, and I played with some really talented guest musicians. That helped a lot.

3.0  What is the title song about? Boredom, stagnation, lack of motivation. The demand for overstimulation. The need to be entertained. The feeling of being left out. My distain for pop culture. Also one of my common themes—the search for something more. I wanted it to be like “Satisfaction” for the 21st century.

4.0  What is your favorite track on the cd? My wife kept asking me to write a song about her. I avoided it for a long time because, in past relationships, this hasn’t worked out so well for me. I try for brutal honesty in my lyrics, and that can create problems. And of course, you’re measured against “Layla” or “Alison,” or “Maybe I’m Amazed.” Anyway, I gave it a shot. The result is “Lucky Guy.” I tried to explore the light and dark sides of our (or perhaps any) relationship, and I felt like lyrically, I really got to the heart of it. I think it’s a fun, but also soulful song. I love the chunky rhythm section. I love the horn section. And my wife likes it, so I am a lucky guy.

5.0  What comes first for you when writing, a lyric, a melody, a riff? Since lyrics are important to me, the first thing I get is a concept or phrase, most likely the song title or the words to the chorus. Then I build a set of changes for choruses and verses. Next I flesh out the lyrics and maybe write a bridge. I’m slow and methodical, and I might revisit the lyrics many times. I love having written a song, but I hate actually doing it. It’s painful for me and requires huge amounts of concentration and introspection. Some guys write a song in an hour. That will never happen to me. For me, it’s a grind.

6.0  How did Ed Stasium’s involvement with the project come about? Ed had worked on a project for a friend of mine and he introduced us. Ed was obviously a big time engineer/producer in the eighties and nineties, and he sort of dropped out of the New York scene, moving to Colorado and setting up a studio out there. I sent him a few songs and he liked them, so he accepted the project. Ed brought a lot to my record, and it was a privilege to work with him. I had been very close with the songs, and it was really great to let someone with objectivity (and talent) step in at that point.

7.0  Do you have a philosophy when it comes to entering the studio? Just to make sure everyone is working towards realizing the song as opposed to making a personal statement. It’s common to work with players who view verses and choruses as things to tolerate or riff through on the way to a solo. It takes maturity to look at the bigger picture, play in the spaces, and choose just the right parts to make the song work. After that, I just go for a rhythm track that’s right in the pocket. It doesn’t make much sense to build on a foundation that’s not solid.

8.0  Any secrets to nailing good lead vocal tracks for you? Whiskey. And when I record a vocal, I think of it as a journey with no road map and no set destination. I don’t think too much, I just try to dig as deep as possible, looking for raw emotion. It’s hard to describe, but I’m sort of in a low-level trance. This can be a hit or miss process. It helps to have a good engineer or producer to guide you through it, because loss of perspective is part of the trip. That may also have something to do with the whiskey.

9.0  Growing up, what artists were your biggest influences? Can you still hear them today on “Something New?”I always liked the soul singers—Otis Redding, Sam Cooke, Marvin Gaye, Van Morrison and I tried to channel them even though I’m not in their league as a vocalist. I love 60’s music for its freedom and creativity. Love the Stones. Love Punk. I’d imagine you can hear those influences, but I could’nt tell you where. When I’m writing or recording, I don’t listen to other people’s music because it confuses me. And I’m confused enough already.

10.0  How do you react to criticism of your music? I’m sure what I’m doing isn’t for everyone, and I don’t care. It’s obvious that these days successful pop music is generally disposable, catchy shit. I try to be more than that, possibly to my own detriment. Baring your soul takes balls, and you can’t be afraid to look like a fool. I like what I’ve done. If you like it, great. If you don’t, I can live with that.