LISA HELLER

How did you choose “Life On The Run” to be your first iTunes single?  I chose to release “Life on the Run” as my first iTunes single because I think it is a good representation of who I really am as an artist. As the first thing I’m really putting out into the world, “Life on the Run” is kind of saying I’m going to be myself, and march to my “own beat of the drum.”  I think it is an inspiring song to people who want to strive for a dream and don’t know if they can do it.  I think you can do anything you want to do if you work hard enough.

You are in a unique position releasing material at such a young age: do you ever worry that you may look back later in your career and go ‘OH NO!!”?  I don’t think that releasing material at such a young age (my 19th birthday to be exact) would make me look back and worry. It’s all a learning process and you have to learn who your audience is and feel for what they like and don’t like and work from there. If I never put my songs out into the world, how would I know if people would fall for them? I also think an audience likes to see an artist evolve over time and I plan to continue to grow.

How do songs take shape for you typically ? For me, my songwriting varies from song to song- sometimes I am driving on the highway and have to pull over because I get this one phrase stuck in my head and I have to scribble it on my coffee cup before it goes away. Other times I sit down and start playing different chord progressions on my piano and guitar with varying rhythm, and once it sounds right to me I start humming along until I find a suiting melody, and the words just kind of flow from there. Each song is such a different experience- with some it takes an hour to write the root of the song while with others I could spend 6 months on it just to find the right words.

What’s the bigger high for you: writing, recording or playing live?   Wow that’s such a hard choice! Can I say all three? They are all so different it’s difficult to compare. Writing is something that has been a huge part of growing up for me. I write down the experiences that I’ve had or are new to me, then I compare them to ones I haven’t yet had a chance to experience. But recording is also amazing because it’s like I’m taking all of these ideas that are kind of jumbled up in my head, and they’re put into real solid music. I really get in such a deep zone when I’m recording that I can’t explain. Sometimes I forget what I’m doing and that other people are there listening while I sing into the mic. And lastly, performing is such an amazing experience. The second I step on stage it’s like I feel this connection with the audience that they understand me. It’s like we’re all one, and as I sing about the adversity I’ve faced, as many others have, I’m singing for them, not me. I want to tell them it will all be ok, empowering my audience as well as myself.

What do you want your audience to see or feel when you are in front of them?  When I’m in front of my audience, I want them to feel welcome. There are so many opportunities for people to feel excluded or doubt themselves. But when I’m in front of people I want them to feel like it’s ok to be themselves, and feel empowered.

If you could open for any artist or band on a spill of east coast dates this summer, who would it be?  There are so many artists that I aspire to open for.  Of course Taylor Swift comes to mind, as such a dynamic player in the music industry.  She flawlessly switched from Country to Pop, a task no artist has surmounted with such supportive fans. I also would love to open for Christina Perri – her song “Jar of Hearts” was one of the first songs that I ever performed live and it really inspired me to write down-to-earth, relatable music. Sara Bareilles is also an amazing headliner – she is an artist I emulate and aspire to be like with her words of empowerment without a hint of cliche. Of course I would also be thrilled to open for bands with whom I am connected, such as Waiting for Henry, a group of great guys who have been supporting my hard work from the beginning.

How did you pick up guitar and what advice do you give to others who want to learn how to play?  I taught myself to play some simple chords on the piano which is how I started songwriting. After a while I really wanted to play guitar too so I started looking up how to play chords on google images! This really jump-started my ability to write songs, before I started taking lessons. My advice for someone learning to play guitar is to look up chords if you don’t want to pay for lessons, and keep repeating them until your fingers bleed. After a week or so you will stop hurting and your fingers will just remember where to be placed. From there, you can start writing songs! And for piano, you just need to learn the basic triad structure and go from there!

What were the first few albums you ever bought and what do you think of them today?  The first few albums I ever bought were from my parents, which definitely had a huge impact on my choice of music. As a young child I would listen to Dave Matthews and Coldplay in the car, so it really made me appreciate the deep music where the words had so much meaning and the instrumentation that was so captivating and complex. The upbeat party music was always fun too but that never really affected me the way that songs like “Yellow” by Coldplay did.  U2’s “Beautiful Day” was a perfect song when I needed to appreciate the little things in life or get motivated.

What’s your favorite song of all-time?  I would probably say “Fix You” by Coldplay – It was the song I resorted to throughout high school and it brought so many different emotions each time I listened to it. “Fix You” has this certain indescribable power to heal and unite people.

If you could have an alter ego performing in an alternate universe, what might she sound and look like?  If I were given the chance to be someone else, I would still choose to be me. There are billions of other people in the world but only one me, so if I’m not me then who am I? ~ LisaHeller.com

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BRYANT LEE

1.0 – What’s the best thing about your latest release, the new The Pear Traps EP, Elsewhere

It’s different than our previous EPs.  The first 2 were home recordings that we did by ourselves which is mainly why they took on the lo-fi sound.  Elsewhere is our first “studio” recording and although we kept it uncomplicated, it’s easy to hear the difference.

2.0 – Did you have a sound in mind when you starting recording it or did it evolve?

We completed the songs before actually recording them and knew how we wanted them to sound through our amps/drums/etc, but did not have any idea how it was going to turn out after recording.

we did the recording and mixing ourselves on the early recordings, so we had total control of the sound.  This time we had someone else (Jamie from Carterco here in Chicago) do the recording, mixing and mastering on legitimate equipment (as opposed to our karaoke microphones) and it was definitely a change.

We finished recording in 2 days and then Jamie spent another day or so mixing. During the mixing process Jamie was definitely leaning towards a cleaner, more professional sound and then when we heard the early mixes, we were always like “put more effects on that, make it more lo-fi!”  I think in the end it actually did evolve into a very happy medium and we could’nt be happier with Jamie’s help and input to give Elsewhere its full sound.

3.0 – Do you consider branding & image as part of the artistic process? 

In my opinion branding and image are part of the business process, not artistic.  If you know us or have seen us play a show it’s pretty easy to see that we put zero effort or thought into branding and/or image.  We are 5 friends playing music together because it’s fun and we like playing.  Not to try and make money or get big or anything like that.  Probably because we’re old enough to realize that we do this to have fun at practice every week and play out.  If we ever decided to start focusing on our image or try to be anything other than what we are, I think the enjoyment of us being in this band would go down dramatically.

4.0 – When did you start writing songs and what was your first?

I started writing about 3 or 4 years ago, right before we became a band.  I’ve always been a guitar player and never really thought about singing or writing songs – I actually prefer just hanging out and playing guitar in the background.  But over the years I’d come up with ideas for songs that I thought were OK, run them by the singer and nothing would ever come of them.  After not playing in a band for a little while and not finding anything that I was very interested in I started trying to complete ideas for songs by myself and eventually started singing.  I figured out how to program drums, record/mix audio, and just started messing around with songs in my apartment.  My first finished song was called “Ways to Doubt.”  It’s actually not that terrible and the thought of giving it a shot with The Pear Traps comes up every once in a while.

5.0 – Do you have a philosophy when it comes to writing? 

No, not really.  If I’m ever at home not doing anything I’m usually messing around on my guitar.  If something happens to sound all right I record it.  Or tell myself I’ll remember how it goes but then usually forget about it.  If I come across the recorded guitar parts again (sometimes days or weeks later after I’ve forgotten I recorded anything) and it sounds decent I’ll try to put lyrics to them.  Very little effort or thought goes into the lyrics.  To me vocals are primarily just another melodic part to the music.  Ideally the lyrics end up clever or interesting but as long as they don’t seem extremely contrived or cheesy I’m usually OK with what comes out.

6.0 – And what about the stage and playing live?

Stage presence is another thing we don’t really put too much effort into.  It’s kind of the same thing as image, if we ever had to try to act or be a certain way on stage that wasn’t natural to us, I don’t think we would want to play out.  We have fun playing shows together so I imagine that comes across to the audience, which is all I would really hope for.

7.0 – How did you catch the rock & roll bug originally? 

Possibly a little cliché but it was when I heard “Smells Like Teen Spirit”.  I think I was in 4th grade and had always really been into music but when I heard that guitar intro it just blew me away.  I think my actual logic was that if I learned how to play guitar I could learn those songs and then I could hear them whenever I wanted to instead of waiting for them to come on the radio.  My dad was very musical and supported my interest in learning an instrument but we didn’t have much money so he made a deal with me that for every chore I did I got a dollar saved towards my guitar and after 100 dollars were saved up he’d buy me one.  Couple months later I had myself a very cheap, used white electric guitar and I was ecstatic.

8.0 – Did you have to work at it or does it come naturally?

I was not natural at all, it took a lot of effort for me to be a passable guitar player.  I’m just very stubborn.

9.0 – What’s your favorite record of all-time? 

Possibly another cliché but I’ve honestly got to say The Beatles’ White Album.  It was kind of funny because when I was younger I literally went through my Beatles phase in chronological order.  At first I really liked the poppy mop top love songs even though it was completely dorky and my friends would give me shit for it.  Then heard Revolver and thought it was just amazing.  Then got my hands on an Abbey Road tape and would listen to it on repeat.  Then one year for Christmas my mom bought me the White Album.  I remember listening to it lying in bed and feeling disgusted at how perfect everything they did was- no matter what genre they played in.  I actually remember hearing Dear Prudence for the first time and wanting to quit guitar because I knew there was never any way I could play something that great.

10.0 – What was the first concert you attended and what do you remember most about it today

This one is not so cliché.  My dad liked country and about the time I was listening to Nevermind over and over he took me to a Randy Travis concert.  I actually had tears in my eyes because I hated it so much.

MATT MAGUIRE

1.0 – Are you happy with how your debut Larabee EP Expose A Little Wire has been received?
I am happy. I didn’t know what to expect when I made the decision to release the songs.  It’s been a pleasant surprise to have total strangers listen to the songs and react to them in a positive way.  I’m hoping more people will get to hear the songs as well.

2.0 – Did you have specific goals in mind for the release? There was no master plan for the release of Expose a Little Wire other than to follow in the footsteps of other DIY musicians.  It’s a tricky time in the music business because somewhere along the way people began to assume that music should be free.  So financial goals are difficult to assess.  The main goal is to put the music out and make a connection with people.

3.0 – Are there any plans for a full-length follow up to the EP? There are definitely plans for more recorded music.  I’d love to record a full-length album.  I will probably put out a single or another EP before a full-length because I have songs in the can that I would rather release than hold onto for too long.

4.0 – Do you have a philosophy when it comes to recording?  My philosophy on recording is to get a song to a point where you feel as though you could listen to it forever.  The most frustrating thing about recording is to put in the time, effort and money and come out with something that you can’t stand to listen to.  From a sound perspective, I like classic 1960’s and 1970s recording sounds and styles because on the whole those sounds have staying power.  There’s nothing sadder than to put on a 1980s recording that you loved at the time and realize that the 80s big drum sound ruins the track.  I wish I was more technically oriented so that I could have a better working knowledge of the recording process.  That’s something I need to work on going forward.

5.0 – Your video for “Little Liar” has a great old school vibe & look, how did it come about? Thanks.  I saw other videos that used old footage from various places and came across a neat website that compiled stuff that was no longer covered by copyright, so it was fair game to use.  In searching through the archives I found pieces of a film called “Coffeehouse Rendezvous.”  It was really cheesy but I liked the overall look and feel of it.  Parts of the film were originally shot in the Chestnut Hill neighborhood of Philadelphia, not far from my house, so I used those bits and pieces as a nod to my hometown.  Throw in an iMovie editing feature, and you have yourself a video.  There, I’ve given away all of my video creation secrets.

6.0 – When did you get hooked on rock & roll? what songs early in life left a mark on you most? Probably by age 5.  I am the youngest of five children and I used to sit in my room for hours playing my older sisters’ records – hairbrush microphone in hand.  That stack of 45s was full of Motown, Gary Puckett and the Union Gap, The Foundations, The Monkees and The Beatles.  From the stack of 45s I think The Foundations “Baby Now That I Found You” got a lot of play.  Seriously, how can anybody resist the “ba da da da” background vocals?  A little later I would say that Elvis Costello’s “The Angels Want To Wear My Red Shoes” left a big mark.  That song was really my introduction to The Byrds because of the jangly guitar sound.  Nick Lowe’s Labor of Lust album in it’s entirety is fantastic as is Please Panic by The Vulgar Boatmen.

7.0 –  Have your tunes always had a twang to them or did that develop over time? I think the twang developed over time, but I was always drawn to the twangy stuff by The Monkees did (Papa Gene’s Blues, What I Am I Doing Hangin’ Round), Dave Edmunds, Nick Lowe.  I also had some old Faron Young records as a kid.  I suppose that sound keeps kicking around in my head.

8.0 – Do songs come easy to you or are they labors of love that have to steep before being ready for prime time?  The songs couldn’t come any slower if I tried.  I wish that I could be one of those writers who can bang out song after song.  I am always amazed when I hear someone say that they went into the studio with 30 new songs and whittled it down to 10.  Once written, however, the song structure doesn’t tend to change drastically.

9.0 –  Is there anyone in your life, outside the band, that you trust as sounding board for new material?  I have a friend from high school, Gerry, who used to help manage my old band.  He’s listened to everything I’ve written since I started playing.  His opinion matters because he knows good music and he understands what makes a good song good.

10.0 – Dreaming late last night you got a call from ‘Mr. Bigg’ about a summer tour, what act are you going out in support of?  It would have to be Elvis Costello, but only because he was touring with the spinning wheel of songs from the entirety of his career.  So many great songs.  And because this happened in a dream, all of the fans at the show would become Larabee fans.

TRIS McCALL

1.0  What songs do people gravitate to off your “Let The Night Fall” CD? you know, i’m guilty of putting out albums that i don’t really like from beginning to end. i won’t say which. let the night fall is an exception. i really do dig all the songs on this one. the two closest to my heart are “first world third rate” and “you’re dead after school,” but for opposite reasons. “first world” is a letter from a character who showed up in my head one day, said his piece, and left. i don’t really know who that guy is, or where he went, but his world is an interesting one to inhabit for seven minutes. “you’re dead after school” is the exact opposite: it’s my only autobiographical song. some of the characters are composites — the girl in the song is really three different girls. but i really did have a role model who was arrested for molesting a retarded kid. and yes, i really did write a song about it.

2.0  Gun to your head – what do you liken your sound to? i don’t negotiate with terrorists. gun away from my head, my standard line is that it’s a cross between man-o-war and the “schools on demand” commercial. but i’ve used that so much, so let’s just say it’s a cross between procol harum and c-span.

3.0  What was the first record you ever fell in love with? i grew up on the boss, billy joel, elton john, and the rap records played on my block, and it’s fair to say that i was obsessed with all of that stuff. but the first record i ever fell in love with the way i’d fall in love with another person was joni mitchell’s *blue*. i got it for christmas. i played it the next day and felt like i’d been slapped awake. i’d play that cassette in my walkman, get to the end, flip it over, and play it again, and again. this went on for months. i’d cut class to listen to that album in the school courtyard. i couldn’t imagine anything more important that understanding what she was trying to tell me through that album. now that i’m older, i recognize that my instincts were right: there wasn’t anything more important.

4.0  Your music has a real intimacy about it, is that difficult to achieve? that’s a nice thing to say. i appreciate that. that’s the primary thing on my mind when making a record: does it radiate personality? do you come away from it feeling like you encountered an actual human being? i think the albums i’ve made are successful insofar as they’ve had personality, and for no other reason. pop is the ideal conduit for personality: you don’t just get words, you also get a voice, and inflections, and attitude. it may be an unpleasant attitude; i don’t think it matters. i’m not the best piano player, and i’m certainly not the best singer, so i hope my piano playing has character, and i try not to open my mouth unless i’m giving the listener something to think about. she can then decide if she wants to spend time with me and my cranky perspective. there’s no wrong answer. but to answer your question, i think it’s harder to do than it seems. i’ve seen people with huge personalities go into the studio, and when they try to get it down on tape, it won’t fit the two-inch reels. it isn’t enough to be a character — you’ve got to figure out how to make that character speak.

5.0  You provide in-depth ‘liner notes’ for each tune one your site, should more artists do this? liner notes kinda go with an album like let the night fall. the record has a big word count, and many of the songs are stories. still, just as in chess, every time you move a pawn you create a weakness, every time a musician volunteers something other than what’s apparent on the record, some of the mystery is lost. we live in an age where artists try to cram as much inside information onto the website and the dvd release as possible. do all these looks behind the music really bring us closer to the music, or are we like the people trying to watch the show from the tunnel leading to the dressing rooms?  if you’re doing some shoegaze or psychedelic music and you’re relying heavily on that feeling of who-the-hell-are-these-guys?, it’s probably not so rewarding to build an elaborate website. or to do interviews, or discuss the music at all.

6.0  As a music critic yourself, do you run into conflicts of interest when promoting your stuff? everything i need to know i learned from c.s. lewis or lloyd alexander. there’s a moment in *the book of three* where fflewddur fflam, who is, as you all must know, studying to be a bard of the harp, admits to taran that he is also a cantrev king. and taran kneels down before him in fealty, but fflewddur makes him stand back up. he says “when i’m a king i’m a king, and when i’m a bard i’m a bard.” i attempt to approach rock criticism the way fflewddur would have. i never mention to an interview subject that i’m a musician. when i’m doing a review, i try try try not to measure what i’m hearing against a system of value established by what i’m good at and what i’m bad at. i know it’s impossible; still i try. on the flipside, when i’ve got shows to do, i make sure that i don’t abuse my position by blowing my horn about it in the newspaper. i’m sure this has crippled my efforts to turn out heads, but what can i say?, i need to maintain a shred or two of integrity. otherwise my insomnia will be even worse than it is.

7.0  What is “Sugar Nobody Wants” really about? it’s about finding the cracks in the city that aren’t mapped, or that used to be mapped and have fallen away as the legend has been rewritten, and making your stand there. not down in jungleland, but in the invisible spaces where the authorities don’t bother to look. hiding in plain view. it’s something we know all about on this side of the river.

8.0  If you were a super hero, what would they call you? this question scares me. i imagine it would be something unflattering, or a backhanded compliment, like just-shy-of-insufferable man, or anxiety boy, or iron nose. poor tim lincecum has to be “the freak”; what would i be? i would like very much to be city girl. there is 0% chance that i would be, though; i mean, i’m not even a girl. to keep from being heartbroken,  i will try not to develop superpowers.

9.0  Is music dangerous? it could be. i don’t think that’s been a priority for awhile, though. scary music has been marginalized. the last album that really spooked me was prinzhorn dance school. they’re a duo from reading in britain — a boy and a girl, bass and drums and a little guitar and that’s it. while there was no attempt to dress up the music for mass consumption, i don’t think it was deliberately alienating, either. it just seemed to be bleak journal entries recorded by people who are genuinely disturbed, or doing a hell of a job of playing at being disturbed. it’s sort of the musical equivalent of picking at a scab. lots of repeated phrases, obsessive hammering on the same guitar strings, rudimentary beats, paranoid performances. there’s a song called “eat sleep” that just goes “eat, sleep” over and over. the next song is called “i do not like change.” they tell us there’s no books in the library and how they’re in the black bunker. the emotional cupboard is bare. eventually it sucks you into a world that’s pretty warped. for about two months in ’07, i had to forbid myself from listening to that album because it was doing disturbing things to my brain. so, yes, prinzhorn dance school is dangerous music — at least to me.

10.0  What’s the coolest thing about Jersey City? i’m so glad you asked this question. i have the right answer. the coolest thing about jersey city is our korean grocery stores. we’ve got three of them downtown: lee’s on grove, tender shoot on newark avenue, and p&k about a block west of tender shoot. these groceries are always stocked. the produce is excellent, and affordable, and the korean immigrants who run these stores are, as far as i can tell, the most capable people in town. if mrs. lee from lee’s grocery was our mayor, jersey city would be ten times better overnight. she wouldn’t stand for corruption or incompetence or nonsense. she’d be fair, too. and she’s got a great sense of humor. seriously, if i could pick anybody to run my town, without blinking an eye, i would choose any of the principals from these groceries. they’re there first thing in the morning, they work until nine at night, and they’ll get you anything you ask for. they work weekends and holidays. i really look up to these people — they’re heroes to me. i feel tremendous jer-z pride when i think about what they’ve done. i only hope that people in jersey city realize what we’ve got here. when you go to other cities, they barely have bodegas, let alone awesome grocery stores. lately there’s been one of those “foodie” farmer’s markets at the path station on mondays and thursdays. you know the type: they sell farm-grown cookies and fresh picked mozzarella cheese. it hasn’t escaped my notice that the korean groceries are empty while this farmer’s market is operating. this kills me. jersey city, get your act together. support the local grocers who have always supported you.

Visit www.TrisMcCall.net

STEVE HENRY


1.0  – What is WORMBURNER about musically? Wormburner is a collision of musical influences from the vintage punk, new wave, and classic rock catalogues. On top of this music there’s typically a fairly dense lyrical component, often a narrative.

2.0  – Does the band have a favorite room in NYC?  The Bowery Ballroom. 2nd favorite: Mercury Lounge.

3.0  – Is it important to put on a show when you play live? Absolutely. Wormburner puts on a very physical live show. And audiences seem to respond to that.

4.0  – Which WORMBURNER song goes over best live? Probably “The Interstate”.

5.0  – What’s on your mind right before you go on?  No matter how much we prepare for a show, there’s usually some last-minute crisis to manage. Someone realizes he’s missing a patch cord or a guitar strap or something. I’d like to be able to tell you that the moment before we go onstage is a peaceful, zen-like experience. But that’s usually not the case.

6.0  – Does a band have to tour to be taken seriously? That’s a great question, and it’s a question A LOT of bands struggle with. Without proper support and publicity in advance of playing out-of-town dates, a band can end up playing to a stretch of empty rooms, town after town. And that very commonly leads to a band splitting up. Here’s a typical sequence of events: The band makes an initial impact by filling up rooms in their hometown, then they quit their day jobs and book a tour. The tour ends up being a disaster because no one outside their hometown has heard of their particular band, and no one comes to the shows. The band hemorrages money, and the band members grow bitter and they stop believing in what it is they’re doing. They go their separate ways and they often consider their band to have been a failure. It’s just my opinion, but it might be wiser for a band to have landed some sort of fully-funded publicity machinery behind them before quitting their day jobs and trying to make a living playing music on the road.

7.0  –  If the band had their own reality series, what might it be called? Personally I try to avoid reality TV at all costs. I’m pretty turned off by people who strive to get on TV in order to achieve some sort of ‘celebrity’ status. Sorry to be a downer but it’s just not my thing. So I can’t really even think of a clever title for a reality series about Wormburner. Sorry.

8.0  – Do you guys have a super fan? Yes. Her name is Terri O’Rourke and she’s the best. She comes to all our shows. But I don’t think we can claim her as exclusively our own super fan. Terri is a fixture on New York’s indie music scene, and she’s a true appreciator of great music. It’s an honor that she counts Wormburner among her favorites.

9.0  – For your half-time gig at the Super Bowl next year, you do a medley of which three WORMBURNER tunes? Peekskill –> Stolen Tags –> The Interstate

10.0  – Is magic a part of the musical equation for you? Sure. There’s definitely a certain magic to the songwriting process. I like to think that Wormburner has experienced this as sort of “a visitation.” One minute you’re in a studio making what feels like a directionless racket with your instruments, and ten minutes later a fully-formed song has revealed itself. That song didn’t exist ten minutes prior, and it’s a pretty cool thing.

SAM GJOKAJ


1.0 How long have you been ON-WE? Officially its been almost 3 years.  We just passed our 3-year anniversary as a band.  I remember the date because our first show was 07-07-07….oh yeah, jackpot!
2.0  How did it start? How did it become a band? I had been in and out of bands/projects since the late 90’s for a while and I met Bridget back in 2003 at an open mic while in BBMT. After listening to a self-produced demo she had done, I thought “I have to be involved in a band with her.” She was quite unique, had an amazing voice/sound and had recorded everything on her own.  We wrote and jammed from our first days together but never had organized the music enough to create a band around it because we were seriously involved in other bands at the time.  I went to an O’Callaghan Christmas party with Bridget and met her brother, Brian O’Callaghan, in 2006.  He played bass and I thought this was a great opportunity to start “the band.”  We played several shows before we had a drummer or a complete line up.  Once we had enough material, we recruited the rest the band and, in a matter of months, began playing out.  Sometimes you just have to go for it instead of waiting for the right line up or moment.
3.0 How has the Chicago scene changed since your days in BBMT? The scene hasn’t changed much but my fans have; they’ve grown up.  There is this new demographic that we are trying to capture while enticing the old at the same time.  Chicago has always been a great launching ground for local music if you have the right material, vibe and look.4.0 Why do you do this? I do it because I am addicted to making music – it is an instinctive part of me.
5.0  What are ON-WE’s immediate plans? We are working on incorporating more of an electro vibe with a rock & roll edge because I write on the guitar and so hear guitar in our compositions. I like pretty melodies and ambient sounds but like a bit of grit too.  Its a signature dynamic that I like and strive for no matter what I’m involved in. I like walking that tight-rope of tension in my arrangements; it mimics life which has no constants and can change on a dime.6.0  Are you guys planning on releasing a proper ON-WE record?  We are and will soon. I think our aim is to release something we have no regrets about.
7.0  Does a band need a shared philosophy beyond the music to stay together? I’m not sure that the a shared philosphy keeps a band together.  I know that you have to keep things fun, creative and be mindful and respectful of others involved. That will give a band the staying power they need to persevere.
8.0  Why do you always wear black, Sam? I am a big fan of Johnny Cash and of the path not taken, could be part of black allure.
9.0  When you think about artistic purity, is there any room for pop music? Not unless you are creating the music that becomes popular.
10.0  Will robots ever conquer rock music? They just may if they can tap into what makes us human.  Humans can be as predictable as they are unpredictable. The path we choose is decided by what some call ” the human factor.” Maybe there will be a mathematical preset in the future for this but I doubt it will make great music ~